Contact information:

Discipline: LD/Endurance, CMO, Trail Rider, Cartoonist, Writer, Co-Director/ Green Bean Endurance
Email: jackereynolds@yahoo.com


February 13, 2015

Minimizing Risk: Endurance Riding








Minimizing Risk

Today I’d like to talk about the “scary” part of participating in distance riding 
(or any high performance sport for that matter). 
 My intent is not to frighten you but rather to look at what you are
 doing in a logical way so that you may minimize your horse’s
 risk when out on the distance trail.

Endurance riding is an extreme sport.  You will test your horse’s limits and you will test 
your own.   
 Our horses are at risk any time we load them up, haul out, saddle up, or hit the trail.  
They are
 horses after all and horses have a way of getting into trouble. 
 So let’s look at a few ways to assure
 some measure of safety, though you need to realize up front there is never a guarantee. 

Preparation:  The best hedge against a problem for your horse is preparation.  Follow a good
 gradual 
plan of
 training and conditioning.  
You notice I say training and conditioning?   They are not the same things. 
 Training means your horse loads and unloads quietly, ties without pulling back, 
stands still while you mount, stops and goes when you ask, and travels at the speed you request
 (rather than running wild with a herd mentality).  Conditioning means you spent at least 12 weeks
 (sometimes more) gradually .stressing your horse and built them
 to the rigors expected of them at a ride. 
You have probably heard it said in some circles “I can take a horse right out of the field and 
complete
 a limited distance ride.”  My answer to that is why would you do that to 
your horse?

CONDITIONING     
http://www.seraonline.org/Conditioning.pdf

PACING

Recognizing a problem.   Who knows your horse the best?  You.  If you have prepared for your 
first endurance rides it means
 you have spent a lot of saddle time with your horse.  
 During this process you should have worked out things like drinking and eating.  You should have a 
clue
 if your horse is hydrated,
 respiration is too high, or that sad “let’s not do this anymore”
 look in your horse’s eye.  
 The veterinarians are there for you, but you are your horse’s advocate. 
  Know your horse, and spend time after each conditioning ride taking a critical look at your horse.  

RECOGNIZING PROBLEMS

Knowing when to pull the plug.  Once you or the ride vet have recognized a problem, 
it is time to pull the plug.  Ride over.  Live to ride another day. 
 This is your best way of avoiding becoming a statistic. 
 It is a let down, but not as much a let-down as having your horse in treatment or worse. 

Understand that not all horses are cut out for this sport.  Notice that I said not all. 
 Most breeds of horses have athletic individuals that can participate (participate-not race-not win) in the sport.  
 If you are very competitive and are riding a quiet, heavily muscled horse, well-okay, lets start slow and see 
what happens. 
 It may take a few rides to figure out, well---my horse doesn’t like this, or my horse just isn’t able to perform 
at this level. 
You may just need a better conditioning program.  However,  just like my sorry butt isn’t ever going to 
run a marathon,
 your
 horse might not either. 
 In that case if you are set to go at the sport, you reduce your goals to a manageable level, or you look
 for
 an athletic horse.  
That said, there are examples of many breeds participating at the horse’s (not the rider’s) level in this
 sport.  
So that is a choice you make in the best interest of your equine.

The moral of all this?  Pay attention, prepare, set reasonable goals, know your horse, know when to pull the plug
 either on a given day...or forever.   

Source documents: www.aerc.org






No comments:

Post a Comment