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Discipline: LD/Endurance, CMO, Trail Rider, Cartoonist, Writer, Co-Director/ Green Bean Endurance
Email: jackereynolds@yahoo.com


May 15, 2010

Mel was right....we have a problem.

Mel was right. Dead right. I wish she was wrong. But she isn't. I rode the new pad, which was just a thicker version of what I had. My thinking was that my weight was causing the bumps. Uh-uh. After a ride over ten miles I usually go out and get her after a couple of hours, feel her legs for heat, look for puffiness, check her withers and back, look for rubs and all that. Her back was a mess. Where she had two nickle sized bumps before, she now has over a dozen after ONE MODERATE RIDE. So the extra thickness made even more heat build I guess. The bumps look more involved with the skin now rather than the deeper tissue of the muscle. Doug and I were trying to sort out why now, when all along I've ridden this pad with a lot of success. The answer is that I've always rode this pad in cool temperatures. She tyed up last spring, so when I finally went back to riding I was starting over and she wasn't having it on long enough to create an issue. By the time we got up to any mileage at all it was fall, and winter again. So heat wasn't the issue it is today.

Having just purchased the new Crestridge pad I'm just not able to get a new pad between now and T.O.R. So I dragged (and I mean it would have been amusing to an observer) myself up into the nose of the horse trailer to find Puddin's Skito pad. It has the cool back lining. I also have a new Skito that is cut for an English saddle that would be a fairly easy fix to modify the shape if older works. The new pad is a wool back and has the inserts which are open cell and should let some heat escape. As a last resort I have a barrel racing pad that I can give a whirl that is stuffed with felt.

These bumps don't seem to get any kind of a reaction from her. If I can reduce the heat will they go away? How long will it take?

*totally gnashing teeth, whining and carrying on...only two weeks until TOR*

~E.G.

4 comments:

  1. Toklat woolback or skito with 100% wool is all I would ever use for endurance. Tried the HAF pad but I like just the plain wool so much better. Never had any heat bump issues. My main pads are the 100% wool Toklats. The skito is my husbands.


    Michelle

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  2. I was told that leaving the pads on her back and letting the back cool slowly helps.

    Farley's bumps go away in about a week, however I didn't ride that week because it was the week after a ride.

    I find that using the wool pads makes them worse. My best luck has been using the Haf pads to keep the back as cool as possible. Wool seems to do well in the winter where heat is not an issue.

    Melinda

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  3. http://enduranceridestuff.com/blog/2010/04/endurance-riding-gear-product-reviews-saddle-pads-part-1/

    This lady knows her stuff. Don't take my word for it. People have the misconception that wool is hot.

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  4. I'm going to do our 15 mile ride using the cool back skito. Phebes is very sensitive and thin skinned. This was Puddin's pad, and she always had a really good back (no heat, lumps, bumps, or sore spots). Phebes was having dry spots under it when I started her under saddle, but her shape has changed a lot since then. Her sweat pattern looked really good on Sunday, but it was a short ride. I have a beautiful skito wool back...if I use it with this saddle I'll have to trim the shape and restitch...really hate to do that on a pad that was that expensive. But I will if I have too. I was saving this pad in hopes that eventually I can get my Euro-light. I have a Toklat cool back that is almost new too which I can try if all else fails I guess.

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